Driving on wet or flooded roads

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MISTED UP WINDOWS: If your vehicle has air conditioning, turn it on and direct the airflow to your windscreen and side windows with the fan on its highest setting. In a car without AC the procedure is the same, but you may need to wait longer for the windows to clear.

TURN ON YOUR LIGHTS: Whenever visibility is poor or it rains, dipped beam headlights are a good way to let other drivers know where you are. As a rule of thumb if you need your wipers on all the time, then you should turn your headlights on.

ROAD SURFACE: Rain is most dangerous when it falls after a dry spell on to roads that have become polished and smooth: the rain blends with oil and rubber-dust deposits on the road surface to form a highly dangerous skid mixture.

AQUAPLANING: Happens when the water in front of your tyres builds up faster than your car’s weight can push it out of the way. The water pressure causes your car to rise up and slide on a thin layer of water between your tyres and the road.

HANDLING A SKID: Losing control of your car on wet road at speed is a frightening and extremely dangerous experience. If you find yourself in a skid you should try to regain control by quickly steering into the skid.

MOTORWAY & HIGH SPEED DRIVING IN RAIN: You’re supposed to leave a two second gap between you and the vehicle in front in dry weather on a good road surface. You need to at least double this in wet weather (at least four seconds).

DRIVING THROUGH DEEPER WATER: Where water has flooded onto the road, drive very slowly and cautiously. Never drive through fast moving water and watch out for manhole covers or drain grids that have been dislodged by the water flow. Once you have successfully negotiated the deep water, don’t forget to test your brakes.

DON’T DRIVE WHILE FATIGUED: Driving in heavy rain or flash flood conditions takes a lot of concentration and it can be very tiring. It is important you take regular rest breaks.